• La Ruta

    Resumen de la ruta bicicleteada hasta ahora y la proyectada...

  • Ruta Nórdica: Parte II

    Segunda parte de la ruta nórdica. Islas Feroe, Dinamarca, Suecia y Finlandia

  • Islandia. Tierra de Fuego y Hielo

    Primer país de Europa. La lejana Islandia

2017/12/12

Austria y Alemania

Los 60 kilómetros que separan las más próximas capitales de Europa, Bratilsava y Viena, llenos de un intenso verde.
The 60 kilometers that separate the closest capitals of Europe, Bratilsava and Vienna, full of an intense green.
Lo que hace unas décadas era parte de cortina de hierro en Checoslovaquia, hoy no es más que un intenso verde lleno de pistas para cruzar en bicicleta donde nacen carteles dando la bienvenida a Austria; con Eslovaquia y Austria dentro de la Unión Europea, los controles fronterizos están suprimidos hace bastante tiempo. Esa frontera caliente de antaño, me daba la bienvenida a Austria y al mismo tiempo, a la Europa Occidental.
What was a part of the iron curtain in Czechoslovakia a few decades ago, today is nothing more than an intense green full of tracks to cross by bicycle where posts came up welcoming Austria; with Slovakia and Austria within the European Union, border controls have been suppressed for quite some time. That hot border of yesteryear, welcomed me to Austria and at the same time, to Western Europe.

Tan solo unos pocos kilómetros entrado en Austria, mientras pedaleaba hacia Viena desde Bratislava volví a reencantarme con los sabores y paisajes de Europa.
En esas pocas horas de viaje mientras descansaba con una cerveza austríaca y recién acostumbrándome a oír el alemán, ese idioma que parece hablarse tan cortante y serio, se me acerca un chico. Mathias.
Only a few kilometers into Austria, while pedaling to Vienna from Bratislava, I re-enchanted myself with the flavors and landscapes of Europe.
In those few hours of travel while resting with an Austrian beer and just getting used to hearing the German, that language that seems to speak so sharp and serious, a guy approaches me. Mathias.

¿Porqué me gusta tanto la cerveza? Las buenas historias jamás comienzan con “Estaba bebiendo un té…”. Casi siempre que ha habido alguna cerveza de por medio, me han pasado las mejores anécdotas, y Mathias no fue la excepción.
De pelo largo y desgarbado, un poco más alto que yo pero mucho más macizo, se acercó hacia mí.
    -Por tus equipaje parece que estás haciendo un viaje largo – Me preguntó.
    -La verdad es que sí, estoy intentando dar la vuelta al mundo
    -Wow…Si te pasas por la parte occidental de Austria, te puedes quedar en mi casa – Decía al tiempo que me muestra en el mapa y veo que su ciudad, Bizau, enclavada en los Alpes austríacos, me quedaba como anillo al dedo.
Why do I like beer so much? Good stories never start with "I was drinking a tea ...". Almost every time beer has been involved, I have had the best anecdotes, and Mathias was no exception.
With long, ungainly hair, a little taller but much more bigger than me, he approached and asked me:
     -For your luggage it seems that you are making a long trip
     -The truth is that yes, I'm trying to round the world on a bike
     -Wow ... If you go through the western part of Austria, you can stay at my house - He said while showing me on the map and I see that his city, Bizau, nestled in the Austrian Alps, was perfect for my route.

Luego de un rato compartiendo unas cervezas me comenta que iba desde Viena hacia Bratislava, uniendo los 60 kilómetros que separan a las capitales más próximas de Europa (ok, ok, la segunda considerando la dupla Vaticano-Roma, pero vamos, digamos que esa es la misma conurbación, así que no cuenta para mis efectos), pero en la otra dirección. Se había extraviado y ya no alcanzaba a llegar antes del atardecer a la capital eslovaca.
    -Cómo te perdiste?, no revisaste el celular o el GPS?
    -No uso celular, menos GPS – Ese fue el primer signo de que Matías estaba algo loco. Pero de esos locos en el buen sentido de la palabra.
No recuerdo exactamente como fue derivando la conversación, pero resultó acordó devolverse conmigo a Viena y hacer algo en la ciudad esa noche de sábado. Me dijo la frase a la que terminé acostumbrándome: “I’m going with the Flow” (algo así como dejaba que el viento lo guiara). Pedaleando hacia Viena, y luego de pasar frente a un campo nudista y unas plantaciones de marihuana, terminé por enterarme que la más conservadora Europa del Este, ya se había acabado.
After a while sharing a few beers he told me that he was going from Vienna to Bratislava, crossing the 60 kilometers that separate the closest capitals of Europe (ok, ok, the second considering the Vatican-Rome duo, but come on, let's say that is the same conurbation, so it does not count for my effects), but in the other direction. He had gone astray and could not reach the Slovak capital before sunset.
    -How did you get lost ?, did not you check the cell phone or the GPS?
    -I don't use cell phone. Of course that GPS also don't- That was the first sign that Mathias was a little crazy. But crazy people in the good sense of the word.
I do not remember exactly how the conversation was derived, but we agreed to return to Vienna and do something in the city that Saturday night. He told me the phrase that I ended up getting used to: "I'm going with the Flow". Pedaling to Vienna, and after passing in front of a nudist field and some marijuana plantations, I fast realized how that conservative Eastern Europe was already over.
Mathias rodeado de un campo de Marihuana, FKK (zona de nudismo) y semáforos "gayfriendly". Tres imágenes que jamás hubieran ocurrido en la europa del este.
Mathias surrounded by a Marijuana field, FKK (nudism zone) and "gayfriendly" traffic lights. Three images that would never have happened in Eastern Europe.
Llegamos a Viena y me esperaba Ferdinand, un chico Alemán que había contactado antes de llegar y me ofreció alojar donde él esa noche. Muy simpático con quien hice buena conexión de inmediato. Era mucho más serio y cuerdo, era la antítesis de Mathias y me causó mucha gracia el hecho de júntalos. Acordamos salir los tres y ver que tenía Viena para ofrecernos.
We arrived in Vienna and Ferdinand, a German guy I had contacted before arriving to host me, was waiting for me that night. Very nice person with who I made good connection immediately. He was much more serious and "normal", it was the antithesis of Mathias and I really liked the fact of joining them. We agreed to go out the three and see what Vienna had to offer.

La tierra de Mozart. Una de las pocas ciudades que me cautiva en tan poco tiempo. Más allá de su noche, me encantó lo armonioso de sus construcciones, sus colores, sus cafés y su arte callejero. Si no fuera por sus altos precios, ya que todo costaba bastante más que los países vecinos del este, sería de las pocas ciudades de Europa a las que sin pensarlo me vendría a vivir.
The land of Mozart. One of the few cities that captivates me in such a short time. Beyond his night, I loved the harmoniousness of its buildings, its colors, its cafes and street art. If it were not for its high prices, since everything cost much more than the neighboring countries of the east, it would be one of the few cities in Europe that I would come to live without thinking.
Viena
Mientras veíamos los tres uno de sus cientos de espectáculos callejeros, salió la idea.
Mathias me pregunta si me puede acompañar hasta su casa en bicicleta. Básicamente atravesar Austria de Este a Oeste.
Tiempo atrás no lo habría pensado dos veces, habría sido un inmediato no. Cuando partí, me dije que iba a estar siempre solo, era MÍ viaje. Pero el Carlos que pedaleó por Chile, por Perú o por Bolivia, no es el mismo que llegó a Europa, explicar el hecho de como he ido cambiando a lo largo del viaje da para un capítulo aparte. En fin, acá tampoco me lo pensé dos veces. Pero para un “por supuesto. El lunes salimos”. Además, como si se hubieran alineado las estrellas, Ferdinand tenía un saco de dormir y una carpa para pasarle a Mathias. No había excusas.
While we saw the three of his hundreds of street shows, the idea came out.
Mathias asks me if he can accompany me to his house by bicycle. Basically cross Austria from East to West.
Some time ago I would not have thought twice about it, it would have been an immediate no. When I left, I told myself that I would always be alone, it was MY trip. But the Carlos who cycled through Chile, Peru or Bolivia, is not the same one who arrived in Europe; explaining the fact of how I have been changing during the trip for a separate chapter. Anyway, I did not think twice here either. But for a "of course. On Monday we left. " In addition, as if the stars had been aligned, Ferdinand had a sleeping bag and a tent to pass to Mathias. There were no excuses.

Esa noche conocí a Lily, una linda chica austríaca, música y con quién hicimos una hermosa amistad. Se ofreció para alojarme hasta el día de la partida. Me llevó al día siguiente a recorrer la ciudad hablando en un perfecto español. Y a veces inglés. Y otros, portugués…O italiano. Haciéndome conocer un poco de los rincones inexplorados de la ciudad, a esos que los turistas de tarjeta de crédito no llegan.
That night I met Lily, a beautiful Austrian girl, music and with who I made an amazing friendship. She offered me to stay until the day of departure. She took me the next day to tour the city speaking in perfect Spanish. And sometimes English. And others, Portuguese ... Or Italian. Making me know a little of the unexplored corners of the city, those that credit card tourists do not reach.
Lunes por la mañana, todo preparado con mi improvisado nuevo compañero. Próxima misión: Münich, Alemania.
Mientras nos empapaba la lluvia de Austria y veía como Mathias se envolvía en bolsas de supermercado para capear el temporal, nos íbamos bordeando el río Danubio con un hermoso verde de distintas tonalidades.
Íbamos conociendo cada uno de los pueblos del norte de Austria mientras Mathias me contaba un poco de cosas de su país.
Debo reconocer que extrañaba pedalear acompañado. No sé si lo haría por todo el viaje, pero fue uno de los pedaleos más entretenidos que he tenido. Tres días nos tomó pedaleando por el verde austríaco, quejándonos al mismo tiempo por sus precios, pero disfrutando del país, para quedar a un par de kilómetros de la frontera con Alemania.
Monday morning, everything prepared with my improvised new partner. Next mission: Münich, Germany.
While the Austrian rain soaked us and I saw how Mathias wrapped himself in supermarket bags to weather the storm, we went along the Danube river with a beautiful green of different tonalities.
We were knowing each of the towns in northern Austria while Mathias told me a little about his country.
I must admit that I missed pedaling accompanied. I do not know if I would do it for the whole trip, but it was one of the most entertaining pedaling I've ever had. Three days took us pedaling through the Austrian green, complaining at the same time for their prices, but enjoying the country, to be a couple of kilometers from the border with Germany.







Atravesando Austria de Este a Oeste
Crossing Austria from East to West
A poco de alcanzar Alemania, me comenta Mathias que estábamos a escasos kilómetros de un lugar histórico, la casa donde nació uno de los personajes más funestos de la historia. Hitler.
Aun en territorio austriaco llegamos a la ciudad de Braunau Am Inn y ahí estaba una sobria placa al frente de la casa que al parecer le quedan pocos años de vida, ya que se planea demoler para evitar que sea lugar de peregrinaje para neo nazis.
Tan solo 4 kilómetros más adelante…Alemania, el país 30 del viaje.
Shortly before reaching Germany, Mathias told me that we were a few kilometers from a historic place, the house where one of the most unfortunate persons in history was born. Hitler
Still in Austrian territory we reached the city of Braunau Am Inn and we saw the sober plaque in front of the house that apparently has a few years to live, as it is planned to demolish to avoid it being a place of pilgrimage for neo-Nazis.
Only 4 kilometers later ... Germany, the 30th country of the trip.
Para la paz, la libertad y la democracia. Nunca jamás fascismo. Millones de muertos lo advierten
For peace, freedom and democracy. Never ever fascism. Millions of dead people warn
Poco a poco me había dado cuenta de lo “loco” que estaba mi amigo. Recuerdo cuando lo perdí por unos minutos y estaba atrás haciéndole autostop a un barco carguero en el Danubio. O cuando en vez de agua llenaba las botellas de la bicicleta con cerveza. O se ponía a almorzar dentro del supermecado, con todo el mundo mirando, arrastrándome en sus ideas, como me decía “acá nadie te conoce, de qué te preocupas”. O cuando me hablaba de su filosofía de vida…que se parecía mucho a la mía. Pero faltaban algunas de sus locuras todavía.
Little by little I had realized how "crazy" my friend was. I remember when I lost him for a few minutes and he was back hitchhiking a boat on the Danube. Or when instead of water it filled the bottles of the bicycle with beer. Or when he had lunch inside the supermarket, with everyone watching, crawling me on his ideas, since as he told me "nobody knows you here, what do you worry about". Or when he told me about his philosophy of life ... which was very similar to mine. But some of his follies were still missing.
Bienvenida Alemania
Welcome Germany

Staff del Marktl Football Club 
Recién entrados en Alemania, en el pueblo de Marktl, pedaleando entre senderos y campos de maíz con el atardecer ya convirtiéndose en noche, divisamos a un equipo de Futbol entrenando, el Marktl F.C.
Mathias se detiene y parte a donde están los jugadores. Me quedé atrás ya que no hablo una pizca de alemán. Vuelve, ahora con el preparador físico del equipo.
-Carlos, tenemos ducha gratis!
Me imaginé al instante esas óperas que escuché en Viena como música de fondo. Estábamos pestilentes luego de 3 días de pedaleo sin parar.
-Sí, y además nos invitaron a cenar y podemos dormir en los camarines – Agregó.
Menos de una hora teníamos en Alemania y ya amaba el país. Sin embargo, venía lo mejor.
Newly entered in Germany, in the village of Marktl, pedaling between trails and fields of corn with the sunset becoming night, we spotted a football team training, the Marktl F.C.
Mathias stops and leaves to where the players are. I stayed behind since I do not speak a bit of German. Come back, now with the team's physical trainer.
-Carlos, we have a free shower!
I instantly imagined those operas that I heard in Vienna as background music. We were stinking after 3 days of non-stop pedaling.
- Yes, and they also invited us to dinner and we can sleep in the dressing rooms - He added.
Less than an hour we had in Germany and already loved the country. However, the best came.


Al momento de cenar y compartir unas cervezas y a tan solo 110 kilómetros de Münich, un solo día de pedaleo, nos preguntan si veníamos al Oktoberfest.
Aun no era octubre, era solo el 15 de septiembre del 2017, pocos días antes de las fiestas patrias de Chile, con un poco de nostalgia considerando lo lejano que estaba de mi país y las celebraciones mezclados con el fallecimiento de mi tío hace exactamente un año.
    -Ay, hubiera sido un sueño quedarme al Oktoberfest, pero con los precios de Alemania imposible aguantar dos semanas hasta Octubre – Le dije a la amable chica que nos atendía.
    -De qué dos semanas hablas. Empieza pasado mañana.
    -…¿En serio? ¿Y en qué ciudad es? ¿Berlín?
    -Jajaj, es en Münich. Acá al lado.
Nos miramos con Mathias y comenzamos a reír, él tampoco lo sabía. No podíamos creer lo afortunados que éramos.
-Ahora entiendo Mathias porque no pudimos encontrar alojamiento para el sábado - El día que nos enteramos que empezaba la celebración, donde nos cobraban algo así como 150 euros por noche.
-Sí. Pero tenemos que ir igual, por último dormimos en el piso.
-Absolutamente. No iba a será la primera vez que lo haga de todos modos.
At the time of having dinner and sharing a few beers and only 110 kilometers from Münich, a single day of pedaling, they ask us if we came to the Oktoberfest.
It was not yet October, it was only September 15, 2017, a few days before the national holidays of Chile, with a bit of nostalgia considering how far I was from my country, mixed with the death of my uncle exactly one year ago.
    - Oh, it would have been a dream to stay at the Oktoberfest, but with the prices of Germany it's impossible to stay here two more weeks until October - I said to the kind girl who looked after us.
    -What two weeks do you talk about? It starts the day after tomorrow.
    -…Really? And in what city is it? Berlin?
    -Hahaha, it's in Münich. You're close.
We looked at each other with Mathias and started laughing, he did not know either. We could not believe how lucky we were.
-I now understand Mathias why we could not find accommodation for Saturday - The day we learned that the celebration was starting, where we were charged something like 150 euros per night.
-Yes. But we have to go there anyway, no matter if we we sleep on the floor.
-Absolutely - It was not going to be the first time I did it anyway.



Mientras llevé a Mathias a una fiesta mexicana para devolverle un poco la mano de todo lo que me enseñó de su país y donde quedó maravillado con la sangre latina y la forma en que se celebra por acá, partimos al día siguiente al Oktoberfest.
While I took Mathias to a Mexican party to give him back a little of everything he taught me of his country and where he was amazed by the Latin blood and the way it is celebrated around here, we left the following day to the Oktoberfest.

Caminando por las calles de Munich, por barrios que parecían una pequeña Estambul con la cantidad de turcos, llegamos al famoso Oktoberfest. En mi vida había visto tanta, pero tanta gente bebiendo. Era una verdadera locura. Nos hicimos amigos de un grupo de mexicanos, alemanes, belgas y estadounidenses. Poco recuerdo de esa noche, pero tengo claro que terminé vivo y en las puertas del hostal donde no teníamos reservación.
Walking through the streets of Munich, through neighborhoods that looked like a small Istanbul with the number of Turks, we arrived at the famous Oktoberfest. In my life I had seen so much, but so many people drinking. It was real madness. We became friends with a group of Mexicans, Germans, Belgians and Americans. I don't remember to much of that night, but I have clear that I ended up alive and at the doors of the hostel where we had no reservation.



Oktoberfest
Barajamos la posibilidad de acampar en una plaza, donde unos refugiados Sirios o simplemente en el piso de la hostal. En el estado que estábamos no daba para elecciones, el piso se veía como una cama con sábanas de seda. Lo único claro que sabíamos era que 150 euros no íbamos a pagar por nada del mundo.
A los minutos de habernos quedado dormidos, llega el encargado indicarnos que no podíamos estar ahí, que debíamos pagar.
Mathias sale al paso y hasta el día de hoy no sé con detalle cómo fue la conversación en alemán, pero el encargado nos lleva a una pieza contigua, al parecer para el staff, para pasar la noche. Y gratis.
We discussed the possibility of camping in a square, where Syrian refugees or simply on the floor of the hostel. In our drunkenness there were no time for elections, the floor looked like a bed with silk sheets. The only clear thing we knew was that 150 euros we were not going to pay for sure.
Within minutes of falling asleep, the manager arrives to indicate that we could not be there, that we should pay.
Mathias comes to the step and to this day I do not know in detail what the conversation was like in German, but the manager takes us to an adjoining room, apparently for the staff, to spend the night. And free.

Al partir al día siguiente, con una resaca de esas que te hacen replantearte el sentido de la vida, hicimos uno de los peores récords de pedaleo de lo que va de mi viaje, menos de 60 kilómetros. Los supuesto dos días que nos separaban de la casa de Mathias se iban a convertir en tres.
Acampando a las orillas del lago Stamberger, tuvimos el último día de camino planos. Se venía lo hermoso. Los Alpes.
When leaving the next day, with a hangover of those that make you rethink the meaning of life, we made one of the worst records of pedaling of what goes on my trip, less than 60 kilometers. The supposed two days that separated us from the house of Mathias were going to become three.
Camping on the shores of Lake Stamberger, we had the last day of flat road. The beauty was coming. The Alps.



Alemania, entrando a los Alpes.
Germany, reaching the Alps
Si bien en el lado Alemán el camino muy lindo, con los Alpes de telón y suaves pendientes, volviendo a Austria, fue terrible. Tuve la mala idea de enviarme al GPS una ruta de Google Maps (en vez de seguir mis instintos para escoger las rutas como he hecho hasta ahora), pero en vez de seleccionar una ruta para autos, hicimos una como si fuera para llegar a pie. Claro, Google no sabía que tenía una bicicleta de 40 kilos y nos mandó por rutas de senderistas.
While on the German side the road very nice, with the Alps as an the best landscape and gentle steep road, the return to Austria, was terrible. I had the bad idea of sending a Google Maps route to the GPS (instead of following my instincts to choose routes as I have done so far), but instead of selecting a route for cars, we made one as if it were to get there on foot . Of course, Google did not know that he had a 40-kilogram bicycle and sent us on hikers' routes.


Empapados por la lluvia austríaca, cansados, con la espalda acalambrada necesitando una cama y empujando gran parte de las veces las bicicletas por senderos en las montañas sin pavimentar, tuve un flashback de lo que fue Islandia, con todo en contra, climas adversos, pero paisajes que quitan el aliento. Estábamos en uno de los lugares más hermosos del mundo, los Alpes, pero no apreciándolos, sino viéndolos como el enemigo a vencer, luchando contra ellos.
Los últimos 5 kilómetros fueron los peores. De noche y sin baterías para alumbrar. Con lluvia, barro y frío.
La última bajada hacia su casa en Bizau; con el viento en rompiéndonos las manos y rezando porque ningún auto viniera en contra. Pero la salvamos. Y llegamos a su hogar, donde sus padres.
Me quedan mirando con algo de...entre que parecía que venía de la guerra y que…
    -Matías, tus papás sabían que venías? – Le pregunto
    -No - Obvio, si no tiene ni celular.
    -Entonces debo asumir que menos me esperaban a mí, cierto.
    -Asumes bien
Entra la hermana y me dice que no me preocupe, que ya lo conocían y que están acostumbrados a sus locuras. Que era bienvenido en su hogar.
Soaked by the Austrian rain, tired, with my back cramped in need of a bed and pushing most of the time the bikes on unpaved mountain trails, I had a flashback of what was Iceland, with everything against, adverse climates, but landscapes that take your breath away. We were in one of the most beautiful places in the world, the Alps, but not appreciating them, but seeing them as the enemy to overcome, fighting against it.
The last 5 kilometers were the worst. At night and without batteries to light. With rain, mud and cold.
The last descent to his house in Bizau; with the wind breaking our hands and praying that no car came against. But we came alive. And we arrived at his home, where his parents.
They started looking like...like I was coming from the war and....
    - Mathias, your parents knew that you were coming? - I asked him
    -No - Obviously, if he doesn't have a cell phone.
    -Then, I must assume that they were for sure not expecting me, true.
    -Asumes well
His sister comes in and told me not to worry, that they already knew him and that they are used to his follies. That I was welcome in his home.




Bizau, el pueblo de Mathias
Bizau, the town of Mathias
Dos noches de descanso en su casa, donde su madre nos cocinó, lavó la ropa y donde caminamos por ese pueblo perdido entre las montañas. Lugar donde para muchos sería un sueño vivir.
Two nights of rest in his house, where his mother cooked us, washed clothes and where we walked through that town lost in the mountains. Place where for many it would be a dream to live.

La despedida fue triste, era hora de volver al ruedo solo y despedir a este gran amigo, de quién aprendí a perder el miedo al ridículo o, mejor dicho, al “que va a decir la gente”. A sus cortos 23 años tiene más clara la vida que muchos de los más viejos.
En el adiós me regala un par de guantes para el frío, ya que había perdido nuevamente mi par en Rusia.
    -Vas a atravesar los Alpes, los vas a necesitar más que yo.
    -Gracias Mathias. Se te va a extrañar hermano.
Abrazo apretado. Hora de partir.
The farewell was sad, it was time to return to the tour alone and say goodbye to this great friend, from whom I learned to lose the fear of ridicule or, rather, to "what people are going to say". In his short 23 years, life is clearer for him than many of the older ones.
In the goodbye he gave me a pair of gloves for the cold, since I had lost my pair again in Russia.
    -You are going to cross the Alps, you will need them more than me.
    -Thanks Mathias. It will miss you man.
Tight hug. Time to leave.


Hasta pronto Austria
See you one day Austria






2017/11/03

Pueblos Bálticos

Rozeje. Primera parada en Letonia.
Luego de más de dos meses de descanso en Rusia, volví al ruedo. Era hora de volver a entrar a la Unión Europea, o simplemente "Europa" como le dicen rusos.
Los primeros países a atravesar eran Letonia y luego Lituania, los pueblos bálticos, ex repúblicas soviéticas. Si bien también podría considerarse Estonia como parte de las tres "repúblicas bálticas", este último país está ligado culturalmente más a Finlandia y los países nórdicos que ha los bálticos, con un idioma incluso con una raíz distinta. Por este motivo me lo salté; sentí que hacerlo visitado hubiera sido volver un poco atrás en el viaje y revivir lo que fue la ruta nórdica. Con esto en cuenta, me centré en estos dos países solamente.

Mientras Letonia lo decidí cruzar por el interior, alejado de su capital Riga, Lituania lo iba a hacer llegando a su capital Vilnius. Esta última era quizás la menos turística de las tres capitales bálticas, pero por algún motivo me llamaba la atención.
Para ser sincero, no me sentía inicialmente atraído a estos dos países, los hacía simplemente porque estaban a medio camino entre la Europa Occidental y Rusia. Pero como ha sido la tónica en el viaje, cuando menos espero algo de algún lugar, casi siempre termina por encantarme.
Gracias por todo Rusia. Hora de entrar a la Unión europea


La frontera de Rusia con la Unión Europea, siempre será una frontera relativamente "tensa". Sin embargo, el único problema que tuve al atravesarla no fue un guardia ruso de mal humor o el ingreso a la Unión europea. Sino un ataque que recibí los últimos días, en particular la última noche en Rusia. Los mosquitos. No exagero cuando digo que en mi vida había visto tantos reunidos y a pesar de estar cubierto como para ir a la guerra, los pocos centímetros cuadrados de piel expuesta se los devoraron.
Ya en la frontera eso si, me pidieron botar una cajita de leche que compré en Rusia producto del embargo de los países europeos a este país.
En verdad podría afectar la situación geopolítica una cajita de leche? Poco me importó y mientras el guardia se dio media vuelta, escondí la leche y entré con "contrabando" a Europa, jeje.

Días antes de llegar contacto a Vita, Letona que vivía en una ciudad pequeña relativamente cercano a Rusia si me podía alojar. Encantada me aceptó y por si fuera poco, además me invitó a comer con sus amigas.
Muchas de ellas entre broma y broma, se quejaban de los pocos hombres que había en el país, y claro, la proporción es aun más grande que en Rusia.
Ahí tuve mi primer baño del país. Me llenaron de comida del país y conversación donde me contaron sobre la relación con los otros estados bálticos y sus diferencias. País donde si bien comparten con Lituania la misma raíz lingüística, no se entiende casi nada entre una lengua y otra, y que a pesar de ser menos de 3 millones de habitantes, están llenos de dialectos entre ellos!

Mientras alistaba mis maletas para irme y cruzar el país, ya pagado con lo que había sido mi experiencia en el país, Vita me pregunta si me interesaría ir al pueblo de Aglona, donde una amiga me podía recibir. Coincidentemente ese día era la celebración de la Asunción de la Virgen, y allá la celebración era "con todo". Sí, hasta el presidente llegaba a la celebración y medio país se movilizaba a un pueblo muy pequeño. Por supuesto que accedí y partí esa misma mañana rumbo al pueblo, a solo 60 kilómetros de pedaleo.
Camino muy rico y lleno de verde que alegró mi paso. Sin embargo más tarde vería ese verde desde los cielos...
Todo el interior de Letonia con un verde que cautiva.
En Anglona, un pueblo que para esta fecha estaba a tope de gente; literalmente personas durmiendo en carpas al lado de la calle. Ahí me reciben sus conocidos, y mientras armo mi carpa, se acerca Artur y su familia, los dueños de casa que me invitan a comer. Les explico que no, la verdad no quería molestar, pero un no es casi una ofensa.
Me hicieron probar todo tipo de vino, cerveza y quesos letones, incluso me hicieron un reportaje para un medio local que algo de gracia me causó, ya que se referían a mi como "Peregrino de visita por la celebración". En fin, de religioso nada tengo, pero sí que era una celebración que tenía ganas de ver. Debe haber habido un importante porcentaje del país solo en ese pueblo, hace mucho que no veía tanta gente reunida.




Al día siguiente hora de partir, pero antes, Artur me pregunta si quería ver Letonia desde el cielo.
"Qué? Desde el cielo?"
"Sí, tenemos un amigo que tiene una avioneta. Nos cobra solo un monto simbólico, 10 Euros a los amigos. Así que eres bienvenido."
Así, pude ver esos paisajes verdes que aparecieron en mi pedaleo, ahora desde el aire.
Al despedirme de Aglona, de Artur y su familia, partí hacia mi último destino en Letonia, Daugavpils.

Letonia desde los cielos
Aleksandr me esperaba. Y fácil fue darme cuenta que parecía estar de vuelta en Rusia. Todo estaba en ruso en las calles. Incluso Aleksandr hablaba en ruso, al igual que el 90% de la población de la ciudad.
Antes, como broma me decían los Letones que se sentían como extranjeros en su propio país, pero claro, es entendible encontrar tantos rusos, ya sea atraídos por los empleos como los que han vivido ahí toda su vida, desde antes de la separación de la URSS.
Aleksandr fue de esos viajeros con los que se puede estar horas y horas hablando. Me habla de un país (que probablemente ya conozco o conoceré en el viaje) y le respondo con otro. Mil anécdotas de viaje y me convenció de visitar algunos países en disputa, como el Nagorno Karabakh.
En fin, Letonia fue de esos países donde en tan pocos días, pude extraer gran parte de su magia.
Un país pequeñísimo que me sorprendió en tan solo unos pocos días. Era hora ya sin embargo de visitar a su país hermano, Lituania.
Simples monolitos. Las fronteras dentro de la unión europea no son más que eso.
Pedaleando hacia Lituania intentaba ilusamente alcanzar la capital Vilnius antes del atardecer en un solo día. La parada de dos meses y medio en Rusia se comió gran parte de mi estado físico, hace mucho que no pedaleaba con un ritmo tan bajo, así que me di cuenta que era mejor acampar en alguna parte antes de la capital.
Un par de horas antes de esconderse el sol, me encuentro con un pedalero en el camino, Nandor de Rumania, quién estaba viajando a su casa desde Londres.
Nando a pesar de ser rumano, se considera también como húngaro. Era de la minoría húngara de ese país, al lado de Transilvania; él es incluso la primera persona de ese país que conozco de hecho.
Hace tanto que no compartía con un pedalero. Acampando en una especie de bosque, me tocó uno de esos hermosos atardeceres, la infaltable cerveza, para luego nadar hasta una de las tantas islas donde entramos en contacto con la naturaleza.


Al día siguiente Vilnius. Todos me decían antes de llegar...porqué elegí Vilnius como checkpoint.
Me advirtieron de lo poco turístico que era (cosa que para mi es un plus); pero más allá de eso, la encontré bastante plana en un comienzo. Fue como un flashback a lo que fue Belmopán en Belice, una de las capitales más aburridas que he visitado en mi vida.

Vilnius en 4 escenas
Sin embargo con el correr de los días le días le fui encontrando la magia a esta ciudad de no más de 500 mil habitantes. A sus pasadizos y barrios. A su historia tan única, su anexión forzada a la unión soviética. A su cultura y comida. A su bohemio barrio de la "República de Uzupio" (mitad en broma, mitad en serio con constitución y bandera propia), su infinidad de iglesias, su arquitectura y sus "ángeles escondidos" a lo largo de la ciudad. Pero en particular, a una persona que me hizo quedarme más tiempo del pronosticado. Eso último quizás sea historia para otro capítulo.
Luego una semana en la ciudad, el destino era Polonia, la cuna de Juan Pablo II.

Mientras intentaba salir de Lituania y a pocos kilómetros de la frontera con Polonia, me pilló la noche. Al despertar veo que la rueda la tenía pinchada. No hubiera sido problema si no es por el hecho que además amenecí con la bomba de aire mala. Quedé botado en medio de la nada, donde demonios iba a encontrar una bomba.
Caminando de vuelta a alguna ciudad grande, a por lo menos 3 horas a pie, me encuentro en un pueblo a unos lituanos. Al verme con la bicicleta rota arman entre todos un adaptador artesanal y con una bomba de autos. Jornada salvada. En pocas horas ya estaba en territorio Polaco.

Últimos kilómetros de pedaleo por Lituania..

...Hasta llegar a Polonia.
Hasta pronto Lituania. Al parecer hasta más pronto de lo que pensaba...

Un poco de historia:
11 de marzo de 1990.
Independencia de Lituania de la URSS y Chile vuelve a la democracia.
Un lindo día para el mundo.